Mr. Marley Cat

Mavis sends this update: Mr. Marley has become a true companion – he follows me all around the apartment, meets me at the door when I come home and loves to sit by – or on – me while watching TV. Lately he has been spending the night on the extra pillow in bed! Thank you for keeping him for me. Hi to all from Mr....

Harvey and Jasper

Debbie H. shares: Harvey and Jasper are very sweet rabbits – they are doing well! Jasper is a bit more shy than Harvey and would rather hide in the kitchen, but Harvey likes to sit under the rocking chair weher he can see everything!  ...

Spring has sprung…and so have our pets!

Spring has arrived…and with it, an increase in the number of stray pets! One of the most important tools for getting your dog returned to you if it is lost only costs between $3-$10.  Simple and affordable, an ID tag should be part of every dog’s wardrobe! · If your dog is friendly and can be handled, a member of the public can check the tag and call you directly. · List alternate phone numbers in case you are unavailable! But be sure to let the people you list know you have listed them…) One phone number isn’t enough: Tags have 2 sides,  you can list more phone numbers on the back. · Your pet can also be traced by their rabies tag information and/or dog license. Having separate rings for these tags, in case one fails, is also a good idea. · Writing your primary phone number directly on their collar with a laundry/Sharpie marker can help. · A microchip, which can be scanned at most vet clinics and shelters, is important for permanent ID. However, chips are only as good as the accuracy of the information provided to the registration company, so be sure to keep you information current! As there is a greater lag time then simply checking a tag and making a direct call, relying on only a chip can cause unneeded stress and delays for all involved. · Lost Dogs of Wisconsin/Illinois are very successful at reuniting lost pets and have a tremendous online/Facebook reach. Notifying them, as well as local police AND area shelters helps. Use social media to your advantage and post,...

What are the ‘Next Steps’ for HAWS?

As we close out our facility expansion campaign the natural question is “What are the next steps for HAWS?”  The bricks and mortar expansion will consume quite a bit of time, but meanwhile we remain focused on the needs of our community’s animals. HAWS is much more than a building. We are committed to caring for animals by helping people care for animals; through collaborative efforts we will save as many animals as possible.   Education is, and always will be, a huge part of what we do. Education and commitment are the foundation for an entire culture of animal welfare advocates. Many of our original Kids ‘N Critters campers have graduated from college and are now taking the message of compassion forward into their homes, jobs and families. This is an exciting time for education as we see the fruits of our efforts.   Assistance offered through our Behavior Department, SNIP clinic and Animal Rescue Team will be enhanced. Additional training classes for cats and volunteer opportunities will be available in our Behavior Department. Our SNIP clinic will be able to assist more rescue groups and provide additional TNR (Trap-Neuter-Return) services to further reduce cat overpopulation. The addition of GIS mapping software – and combined efforts of our Animal Rescue Team and SNIP clinic – will allow us to target specific cat breeding areas and concentrate our resources. This type of targeting also opens us up for competitive grant opportunities.   Some of the most exciting additions will take place in Adoption Services. More proactive programs for our “cat” people are being explored, including hospice foster caregivers, taming...

Misty’s Message

This story was originally posted as part of HAWS’ Monday Mailbag/Tribute Tuesday on our Facebook page. Animals often impact our lives in ways far beyond their knowing – thank you for sharing yours and Misty’s story, Colleen! HAWS blessed us with our Misty girl. Unfortunately, she was with us only a short time. I remember vividly how depressed she was when we saw her because her sister had been adopted before her and she was alone. I don’t think anyone wanted a 85lb. dog. She was the only large dog at the time. My heart just broke when I saw her and I couldn’t get her to pick up her head to say hello. When we took her into the “meeting” room, she just laid. Again no affect. From that point on, she was meant to be ours: I promised her I would be back the next day to get her and when I left, she didn’t even look at me. That was the longest 24 hours I ever spent! But when we came back the next day and I came around the corner and she saw me, it was as if she remembered what I told her. Where the day before there was nothing, this day she jumped all over the place and barked like crazy. She had been given a bath in the morning and was a big fluff ball (and I mean big)! She hopped into the car and I don’t think she ever looked back. We have a home in the north woods on a lake and that was her favorite place to be. She...

Recognizing Kindness in Youth

Last year we touched the lives of over 7,000 young people who took part in educational offerings here at HAWS. The way for us to change the circumstances of animals in our community for the better is to reach our youth, exposing them to the wonders of animals and all the values that they can teach us. We know, however, that there are young people who stand out above the rest concerning their commitment to animals. Each year, we look for nominees for our Diana Boettcher Youth Community Kindness Award. An Oconomowoc area resident, Ms. Boettcher was dedicated to the area’s animals, especially the wildlife, watching over them as a guardian. In her honor, HAWS is looking for a student who cares deeply about animals the way Diana did – not your average animal lover, but one who puts passion into action. We are looking to recognize a young advocate who, by asking questions, taking a stand and sharing their convictions, is already making a difference in the treatment of animals, thus building a better community. If you know of a student like this, please nominate them! Nominees must be 18 years or younger. Family, friends, community members and teachers are allowed to nominate deserving youth; in addition, students may also nominate themselves. If chosen, the recipient must be available to accept the award at the Friends of HAWS’ 33rd Annual Romp ‘n Rally Pet Walk on May 7, 2016 at Sussex Village Park. Applications must include the nominee’s name, address, birth date, school and an essay (not to exceed 500 words) explaining the youth’s commitment to animals in...

Thank you for being that “Special Someone”

To our volunteers, donors, staff and all in the HAWS Family: I’m not sure you realize how special you are. In our February newsletter, we talked about “Being that Special Someone.” But YOU already are. For us to move forward into a no-kill community, it will take many “Special Someones” to get us there. What is a no-kill community? This is a community where all treatable, manageable and trainable animals are placed in loving homes. Where Annie’s Fund allows us to address medical concerns, we will not continue the suffering of an animal with a degenerative, progressive and painful condition. Our Behavior Department’s MOD SQUAD works to modify difficult behaviors. We will not place a dangerous, unsafe animal up for adoption who, with training intervention and behavior modification, fails to progress. Ferret fun! Kitten Scooby Let’s play! Some-bunny special We have met the no-kill criteria with dogs and with small animals. We are also making huge strides with our cat populations thanks to abundant foster homes, volunteers who help them to stay social and with the spay/neuter surgeries done by Project Guardian in our SNIP clinic. You will see expanded TNR services, a barn cat program and an additional push for foster care families in the upcoming months. For us to maintain our open admission policy, and attain full no-kill status, will take a community effort. Thank you for your dedication to our community’s animals. Together, we can build a no-kill community. Thank you for being that Special Someone! – Lynn and the HAWS’...